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Traditional Markets

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Part of the fun of visiting Acapulco is to visit the many open-air marketplaces around town, where you can find everything from souvenirs and vacation accessories to clothing, jewelry, food, and even furniture, housewares and works of native art and artisanry. Here is a listing of the main traditional markets you will find on or fairly close to the Costera Miguel Alemán.

Part of the fun of visiting Acapulco is to visit the many open-air marketplaces around town, where you can find everything from souvenirs and vacation accessories to clothing, jewelry, food, and even furniture, housewares and works of native art and artisanry. Here is a listing of the main traditional markets you will find on or fairly close to the Costera Miguel Alemán.

Mercado de Artesanías Dalia

This large collection of shops is across the Costera from the Plaza Bahía shopping mall. There are over 60 establishments in a very old market building, offering every sort of souvenir and item of Mexican folk art imaginable. It is a good place to buy the distinctive coconut or guava candies. If you forgot a bathing suit or sun tan lotion, they will have it here. The restaurants here are inexpensive and clean – just the right place for a different sort of breakfast or a typical Mexican lunch. Costera Alemán (Magallanes), 39670 Acapulco, Gro., México.

Mercado de Artesanías Parasal

Traditional Markets Acapulco

El Mercado de Artesanías Parasal, also called locally "El Tepito," is Acapulco’s oldest and perhaps biggest arts and crafts market. It has it all. Here you can choose, from among hundreds of stalls, leather goods, ceremonial masks, chili ristras, alebrijes, ceramics, pottery, decorative items made of shells, hammocks, jewelry of all sorts, silver (both real and imitation), wood carvings, embroidered blouses, dresses and pants, sandals, sombreros, onyx chess and checker sets, cheap guitars, and endless varieties of T-shirts. Many items are of good quality, but some are not, so keep a discerning eye. You will see lots of bootleg DVD's and pirated CD's as well. Calle Cinco de Mayo, Parazal s/n (Centro), 39300 Acapulco, Gro., México.

To get there from the Zócalo, walk east out of the square (with the bay to your right) for a block or two to Avenida Juan Escudero and turn north (left, so that the ocean is at your back). Go a block or two (depending on from where in the Zócalo you started) and walk down 5 de Mayo or Vásquez de León (which is the next block after 5 de Mayo). Turn right and go for a block or two more. (If your street does not go through, just go the left a little, and keep going.) The market is about 2 blocks east and 3 blocks north of the Zócalo.

Mercado de Santa Lucia

While the Mercado Santa Lucia is filled with your typical low quality fair, the crafts fair on Caletilla beach is famous for all sorts of regional arts made by hand by local, indigenous craftsmen. Playa de la Caletilla (Caleta), 39300 Acapulco, Gro., México.

Mercado de Artesanías La Diana

The Diana outdoor market is similar to the Mercado de Artesanías Dalia, just up the boulevard towards downtown. It is somewhat more focued on contemporary needs, like sandals, beachwear and sport clothes. La Diana has much the same feeling of a flea market, though it, too, is housed in a permanent building, open to the air. There are dozens of different stalls, selling all sorts of merchandise, from fine leather goods to trinkets. Its location makes it very convenient for people staying in the area of La Condesa (like the Emporio, Hotel Tortuga, Romano Palace, Fiesta Americana, Fiesta Inn or El Presidente), or who may be passing by there on the way to a bar or restaurant on this very active part of the Costera Alemán. The Mercado de Artesanías Diana is inclined to stay open a little later at night than the other markets because it is found in such a busy part of town. Costera Alemán (Diana Traffic Circle), 39670 Acapulco, Gro., México.

Mercado de Artesanías Noa Noa

Noa Noa is not an enormous and sprawling market like those in the center of the Old Town. This market, near the Tamarindos beach, is more relaxed and less bustling. It invites shoppers to take their time. Most of the usual array of crafts and folk art are on display here, like carvings from wood, onyx and alabaster, woven goods, ceramics and clothing. The prices are potentially just as good as elsewhere, depending somewhat on who is doing the bargaining. Try the coconut sweets (called “cocadas”), which are a local specialty. Costera Alemán (Across from Playa Tamarindos) (Hornos) 39355 Acapulco, Gro., México.

Mercado Papagayo

Near Parque Papagayo, the Mercado Papagayo offers mainly modern souvenir products like T-shirts, beachwear, clothing and toys. A good bit of home made jewelry, including lots of necklaces and bracelets made with shells, can be found here. Prices are reasonable and always open for discussion with a good customer.

Two other shopping opportunities appear near the Parque Papagayo, though they are not so organized as to constitute a "market." One is in the entrance to the park itself, where visitors have yet another opportunity to buy crafts, T-shirts and toys. The other is in the small plaza space to the east of the Hotel Ritz Acapulco, one block east of Parque Papagayo (away from downtown), on the bay side of the street. Here indigenous vendors from upland villages sell their crafts, including a range of woven fabrics, colorful baskets, ceramics, pottery, leather goods, silver and jewelry. Costera Miguel Alemán (Parque Papagayo area) 39550 Acapulco, Gro., México .

Mercado del Campesino

The Mercado del Campesino (loosely translated as a “Country Market”) is comprised of booths and tables spread around in the open air, like all the other Acapulco marketplaces. Folk arts and crafts are all over the place. The ceramics and woven fabrics are usually the best value. The Mercado del Campesino is found in Progreso, the neighborhood between the traditional part of downtown and the area of Parque Papagayo, only farther uphill, crossing the Avenida Cuahutémoc. For those unfamiliar with the area, taking a taxi is a wise decision. Visitors to the Mercado del Campesino praise the tasty sweet rolls that can be found there and the “Chilapa Bread,” which has its origin in a nearby town of the same name. The Mercado del Campesino is "the real thing," so bring a camera. Calle Durango,
s/n (Progreso), 39578 Acapulco ,Gro., México.

Mercado Central

Sometimes called just “the Market” (“Mercado”), the Mercado Central is Acapulco's largest, most active and best-stocked commercial center for fresh food of all kinds. Early in the day it is where people come to buy meats, poultry, produce and seafood. Some booths have non-perishable food items, like honey and spices. Chefs from local restaurants begin their day here, buying the fresh ingredients for their day's customers. Later on (after 10 am) the booths, tables and stalls – more than 400 of them -- open up with wares for the visitors. Vendors offer crafts and folk art as well as items more often associated with “flea markets.” Examples of the native crafts available at the Mercado Central are woven textiles, embroidered clothing, leather purses and belts, ceramics and bright piñatas. You can even have a shirt or jacket made to your own measurements if you can wait the hour or two it will take to produce the finished product. Prices are low, and subject to bargaining. If the trip makes you hungry, several stands sell tacos, tortas, churros, and other prepared foods. Avenida Cuahutémoc at "Cine Rio” (Traditional Zone), 39350 Acapulco, Gro., México.