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Spanish Cuisine

Like the cuisines of other countries, Spanish cooking can vary greatly from one region to the other. Spain's many cultural influences over millennia have made its cuisine distinctive. Olives came from the Phonecians. The flat omelettes (called tortillas) and saffron came from the moors. The Goths brought stews, sausages and many other vegetables. Iberian wheat was abundant, so that Spain developed its own traditions of bread and pastries. Beans and potatoes came from its discoveries in New World. The national signature dish is considered to be paella, a large, pan-cooked mélange of saffron rice, chicken and seafood of all sorts, with vegetables and spices. Acapulco's fresh and abundant seafood has inspired the importation of many other Spanish seafood recipes as well. Those looking for a great paella in Acapulco will be able to find a couple of great examples in local restaurants. Be sure to finish it off with a typical Spanish flan or arroz con leche for desert.

Bambuco As a hotel restaurant, Bambuco is open for three meals a day. However, it is most well-known for its Sunday evening paellas. Diners come here for authentic Spanish cuisine, made with the freshest of...
La Cabaña de la Caleta Visitors to Playa Caleta can not miss this restaurant, which is right in the middle, with views of the beach and the bay, looking towards La Roqueta Island. Wave runners and banana rides can be...
Sirocco Sirocco stood for many years on Hornos Beach between Old Town Acapulco and Parque Papagayo. It was a white adobe structure reminiscent of southern Spain, and Sirocco was synonymous with traditional...

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